“Sometimes, students try to intimidate you,” Giovanni told The Associated Press in a telephone interview Wednesday. “And I just assumed that he was trying to assert himself.” [which is a really stupid conclusion. This is a conclusion fitting for a young man who does not have serious mental problems and who behaves aggressively – they need to be put on the line. But with seriously disturbed people, not only do they need limits to inappropriate behavior, but they need help to begin unraveling and healing from all the trauma or degenerate processes they have inside their minds.]

But then female students began complaining about Cho.

About five weeks into the semester, students told Giovanni that Cho was taking photographs of their legs and knees under the desks with his cell phone. She told him to stop, but the damage was already done.

Police asked Giovanni not to disclose the exact content or nature of Cho’s poetry. But she said it was not violent like other writings that have been circulating.

It was more invasive.

“Violent is like, `I’m going to do this,”’ said Giovanni, a three-time NAACP Image Award winner who is sometimes called “the princess of black poetry.” This was more like a personal violation, as if Cho were objectifying his subjects, “doing thing to your body parts.”

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